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Best Naturalizers for Your Garden

Written by: Catalogs.com Editorial Staff

August 25, 2015
Filed Under Garden and Lawn 

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naturalizers for the gardenby Catalogs.com Info Guru Rosemary O’Brien

Many people love the way a garden beautifies their property, but they often do not have the time to plant or garden on a regular basis due to other commitments.

So why not plant a garden that basically takes care of itself with little interference from you? Some of the best naturalizers for your garden are the simple bulbs and plants many of us grew up with and often include ground covers that spread. Here are a few to consider if you want minimal effort with great reward.


10. Crocus

Crocus

The Species Crocus Grand Collection from John Scheepers provides crocus bulbs whose flowers bloom a various intervals throughout the growing season. Species or Snow Crocus are the first to bloom followed by the Large Flowering Crocus. The Species Crocus will appear in early spring and work best to dress the lawn in the early spring before the first mow.

9. Daisies

Daisies

The daisy is another perennial that loves to spread through your garden. The yellow center is surrounded by white petals with some pink or rose colored varieties. Often looked on as a weed in parts of the United States, the leaves of the daisy are edible and are sometimes used in salads.

8. Tulips

Angelique

Angelique Tulips are one of the best naturalizers for any garden because they are rich and full, and resemble a peony rather than a tulip. Angelique Tulips reward the gardener with at least double the amount of petals whereas the regular tulip only has six petals. Keep in mind they do not stand up to harsh winds or rains, but they bloom well in either sunny weather or in shade.

7. Coneflower

Coneflower

Coneflowers love full sun and loamy soil, and their best bloom time is summer to fall. They are particularly tolerant to drought and the songbirds love to perch on their puffy centers. Coneflowers come in a variety of colors such as red, pink, purple and white, and look great in a summer bouquet of cut flowers.

6. Narcissi

Narcissi

Naturalizing Narcissis Mixtures are a good choice for naturalizing your garden because they can live in a variety of soil types. If you plant them in better soil, however, you will be rewarded by mature flowers sooner than if you plant them in poorly drained areas since they do not like to sit in wet soil for long periods. Make sure you plant in well-drained soil with full sun to filtered sunlight so that the flowers fully develop their beautiful colors.

5. Herbs

Herbs

Some Herb Seeds & Plants are one of the best naturalizers for your garden. Herbs such as Rosemary grow fragrant as you pass them or brush up against them in your garden. Rosemary is also good as a flavoring for meats, beans and added to stuffings. English Thyme not only smells good, but it is great to fill borders and keeps garden pests away from your vegetables and flowers.

4. English Ivy

English Ivy

English Ivy is a good groundcover, but it is terribly invasive, often covering buildings if left unchecked. Its leaves spread horizontally and have been known to climb as high as fifty feet. They sometimes grow small, green flowers, but are known as woody vines with a copious amount of green leaves covering long vines.

3. Lily of the Valley

Lily of the Valley

Lily of the Valley is planted as a bulb and produces dainty, white flowers that bear a sweet scent in the spring. This is another aggressive ground cover that grows well in moist, shady soil, and has to be watch. It is deer resistant, so it helps protect some of the other flowering plants and vegetables in your garden.

2. Strawberries

strawberries

The Pineberry Strawberry spreads well if you do not contain the plant in a pot, but if you are trying to naturalize your garden, this will work very well. Any strawberry plant, often referred to as a bush, will do, but this particular type of strawberry has a distinct white color and its outer seeds are red. They can bloom from mid-summer to late-fall depending on your climate, and grow well in well-drained, sandy soil.

1. Black Eyed Susans

Black Eyed Susans

The Black-Eyed Susan is in the sunflower family and requires little attention in order to create colorful flowers. Originally looked on as a wildflower in its home in North America, the black-eyed Susan is increasingly popular in home gardens. This is another flower that is great in a bouquet or vase.
The best naturalizers for your garden can also be the most invasive plants. While these flowers, bulbs and herbs do not require a lot of work beyond planting, you may need to do a little thinning out everyone now and then, but once you have them planted, they will spread and grow easily. Do your research on your favorites for your taste and your regions, and then go for it! A lovely garden is a welcoming site for any home.



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