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Good Luck Charms

Written by: Catalogs.com Editorial Staff

March 16, 2017
Filed Under Holidays 

Tags: , ,

by Catalogs.com Info Guru Terri Wallace

Sometimes, you need a bit more than wits to get a through a situation.

You need something to give you an edge, something akin to the Felix Felicis that you read about, but never successfully brewed yourself. You need some luck. When you find yourself “luck deficient” consider one of these good luck charms to boost your level of good fortune!


10. Rabbit’s Foot

rabbits foot

A rabbit’s foot has long been hailed as a good luck charm, and this is true for humans—but not so much for all those three-footed rabbits out there. Make sure to purchase your rabbit’s foot from a reputable dealer and, for the love of all that is lucky, don’t try to make one yourself.

9. Four Leaf Clover

Four Leaf Clover

Four leaf clovers are also considered quiet lucky. Be warned, however, of an abundance of “False Four Leaves” out there masquerading as the fair four leafed. If you stumble upon a four lobed leaf in the wild, consult a seasoned professional for identification before undertaking any event requiring above-average good fortune. A good alternative is to stock up on four leaf clover designs and shamrock green in your jewelry drawer.

8. Lucky Stones

Lucky Stones

I know, I know. Rocks are everywhere and, obviously, not all of them bring blessings. So, what makes some stones lucky? Well, true lucky stones are actually otoliths (or ear bones from sheepshead fish). Apparently, indigenous peoples used these bones in amulets and carried them for luck. Hey, if a rabbit’s food can be lucky, who is to say that a fish ear bone isn’t?

7. Horseshoe

Horseshoe

Horseshoes are considered lucky in many parts of the world. Some cultures believe that the horseshoe needs to point up, so the luck doesn’t run out. Other cultures believe that it should face downwards, so that the luck can “run down on you.” If you have no strong leaning, consider obtaining two horseshoes and point one each direction, just in case.

6. Double Rainbows

Double Rainbows

Rainbows aren’t just pretty; according to Irish legend, if you find the end of the rainbow, you will discover a pot of gold. So, if you manage to locate the end of a double rainbow, it stands to reason that you should discover two pots of gold. Sounds pretty lucky to me!

5. Cat’s Whisker

Cat’s Whisker

Some claim that a cat’s whisker brings a measure of luck to the individual who finds it. Considering how portable the whiskers are, it makes sense to tuck a stray whisker in your wallet, along with your lottery tickets and four leaf clover. After all, if cats really do have nine lives, they must be at least a little lucky, right?

4. Fairy Rings

Fairy Rings

Fairy rings are comprised of a circle of mushrooms. This eruption of lucky fungi should never be mowed down, kicked over, or otherwise destroyed, unless you want to break the blessing and incur with wrath of the wee folk.

3. Good Luck Coin

Good Luck Coin

A good luck coin, also known as a “pocket piece,” claims to bring prosperity to those who carry the coin in their pocket. These gold coins were very popular in America during the 1930s, when only the lucky few still had money in their pocket during the Great Depression. However, in the current economic times, the idea of inviting good fortune helps these relics retain their popularity.

2. Ladybugs

Lady Bugs

Ladybugs are considered lucky for several reason, depending on your cultural beliefs. Agricultural societies appreciate the fact that ladybugs eat pests that are harmful to their crops. Some Christian societies associate the ladybug with the Virgin Mary (known as “Our Lady” to devout Catholics). The black spots on the ladybug’s back are supposedly symbolic of the Seven Sorrows of Mary, who was sent by the Blessed Virgin to protect crops.

1. Wishbone

Wishbone

The wishbone, which is called the “merrythought” in the UK, is a bone overlying the breastbone of fowl. The bone is removed when carving the bird and left to dry until it is brittle. Once dry, two people each hold one end and pull it apart until it breaks in two. While pulling at the bone, each makes a wish and the wish will “come true” for the person who gets the “long half” of the bone.



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