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Windowsill Plants

Written by: Catalogs.com Editorial Staff

April 1, 2013
Filed Under Garden and Lawn 

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windowsill plantsContributed by Info Guru Angela Hail

Short on space but want some color?

Filling your windowsill with flowering plants and loads of colorful foliage is a great solution to little garden, no garden or too much concrete in your vistas. Here are our top ten suggestions for windowsill plants.


10. Moses in the Cradle

Moses in the Cradle

If purple is your passion, or if you just want a splash of year-round color in your windowsill, add Moses in the Cradle to your plant collection. It’s easy to grow, since it thrives in nearly any level of light, from full sun to shade, and prefers dryer soil (so don’t overwater).

9. Sensitive Plant

Sensitive Plant

Here is a pretty, fernlike plant that does well in cramped spaces. The leaves of the Sensitive Plant fold up at night (giving this African native its name) and it flowers all year long.

8. Oxalis (Shamrock)

Oxalis (Shamrock)

Admit it, a purple shamrock would make a nice talking point for your home or office. It prefers indirect light, so place it where it won’t get too much noonday sun. Oxalis also prefers wetter soil, making it a great option for you over-attentive indoor gardeners who can’t seem to leave well enough alone. You know who you are.

7. Begonias

Begonias

Begonias come in so many varieties, you are bound to find one to fit your tastes. From stunning foliage to flowers in nearly every color of the rainbow, begonias have dominated the realm of houseplants for good reason. They are diverse and easy to grow, and, come on, who doesn’t like a begonia?

6. Jasmine

 Jasmine

One does not typically think of Jasmine as an indoor plant, but it does surprisingly well in this setting, and can fill your home with the most amazing aromas. Find a constant-flowering bush variety. They adapt to cramped situations, like pots on your windowsill, and add a unique touch to your indoor ambiance.

5. Orchids

Orchids

Don’t let their exotic beauty intimidate you; orchids are easier to grow than you think. Just keep in mind a few of their special (but not complicated) needs to keep them happy and blooming. They like pots that are just barely bigger than their root ball. Buy dedicated orchid potting soil to make sure they get the proper nutrients. And remember that flowering has everything to do with temperature–cooler in the evening, warmer in the day–and little to do with serenading them or performing moonlight rituals, regardless of what you may have heard.

4. Cape Primrose

Cape Primrose

Cape Primrose is a prolific bloomer great for low light situations. This would be a great addition to a north-facing window or one in which the sunlight is partly obscured by an outside tree or hedge. This is especially true if your dark corner needs a color pick-me-up, as cape primrose blooms most of the year.

3. Violets

Violets

Whimsical and petite, think the talking violets from Alice in Wonderland turning their sweet faces to you. Okay … so maybe the Wonderland violets aren’t the best inspiration. They were a little scary. But still. Violets are the tiny-flower’s flower. It doesn’t get more panda-faced-adorable than a violet. And they absolutely love your windowsill.

2. Rose Pine Cone

Rose Pine Cone

The rose pine cone will stay manage-ably shrubby to fit in close quarters while giving off a showy display of color all year long. Deep crimson cones put off a plumage of bright purple flowers surrounded by silver and green variegated foliage. This plant could look just as sophisticated in an office setting as it does in inspiring visual awe in your home.

1. Banana Shrub

Banana Shrub

The banana shrub belongs to the magnolia family, and indeed looks a lot like a very small version of the iconic southern tree. Its striking blossoms bloom all year, but most heavily in the early spring. And, when they are in bloom, will fill the air with the scent of bananas. Exotic, beautiful, and pleasantly aromatic. What’s not to love?



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