Nutrition

Benefits of vitamin E

By Jean Sanders
Info Guru, Catalogs.com

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Is the recent interest in vitamin E justified?
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The benefits of vitamin e are not certain

Even the finest public health and medical services are of limited value to people who have poor health habits. Numerous studies have proven that physical health and longevity are linked to the following: eating a balanced diet, maintaining proper weight, exercising regularly, using condoms and limiting the number of sexual partners, avoiding tobacco, and avoiding alcohol or consuming it in moderation. People who fail to follow these guidelines increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, and other lethal diseases.

Although taking vitamin supplements  is part of their daily supplement routine for most people, the benefits of vitamin E in the human body is not clearly established, but it is known to be an essential nutrient in more than 20 vertebrate species.

The vitamin plays some role in forming red blood cells and muscle and other tissues and in preventing the oxidation of vitamin A and fats. It is found in vegetable oils, wheat germ, liver, and leafy green vegetables. Vitamin E is popularly advocated for a wide range of diseases, but no substantial evidence has been found to back these claims. In fact, recently there have been conflicting reports regarding the benefit of vitamin E. Although vitamin E is stored in the body, overdoses appear to have lower toxic effects than do overdoses of other fat-soluble vitamins. The benefits of vitamin e supplements have been widely discussed and there are various opinions as to it efficacy; however, it has been noted that in low doses it does not seem have a detrimental effect.

In an article in the July 6 JAMA, I-Min Lee, M.B.B.S., Sc.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues analyzed data from the vitamin E component of the Women's Health Study, which tested whether vitamin E supplementation decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer among healthy women.

The researchers found with the vitamin E group, there was no significant effect on major cardiovascular events, on the incidences of heart attack or stroke, as well as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. For cardiovascular death, there was a 24 percent reduction. There was no significant effect on the incidences of total cancer or breast, lung, or colon cancers. Cancer deaths also did not differ significantly between groups. There was no significant effect of vitamin E on total death although some research shows that large doses do indeed have a detrimental effect.

The benefits of vitamin E should be discussed with your personal doctor. There have been so many conflicting research results published lately that it makes it very difficult to determine the best course of action for each particular individual. Another report indicated that the effect of low-dose supplements lowered the risk of death by less than 1%, while high dosages contributed to death. As with all supplements (unless otherwise indicated by your physician), moderation is always preferable.

Online merchants that specialize in vitamin supplements can assist you in determining your needs. However, when considering the facts about vitamin E (as with all other supplements), it is wise to first discuss the matter with your own doctor. Once it has been determined that you should take a particular vitamin or many vitamin supplements, you should consider all the online sources for nutritional supplements. The prices are much more competitive than at typical retail stores and they offer the same guarantees.

People who take daily doses of Vitamin C can boost their immune system, potentially protecting themselves from viruses and colds, according to a study presented at the 60th Anniversary Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). Vitamin C is a nutrient that has been demonstrated to have a substantial impact on human health. Researchers originally proposed that large doses of Vitamin C could decrease the incidence and the severity of the common cold.

This well-known vitamin is important in the formation and maintenance of collagen, the protein that supports many body structures and plays a major role in the formation of bones and teeth. It also enhances the absorption of iron from foods of vegetable origin. Scurvy is the classic manifestation of severe ascorbic acid deficiency. Its symptoms are due to loss of the cementing action of collagen and include hemorrhages, loosening of teeth, and cellular changes in the long bones of children.



Assertions that massive doses of ascorbic acid prevent colds and influenza have not been borne out by carefully controlled experiments. In other experiments, however, ascorbic acid has been shown to prevent the formation of nitrosaminesócompounds found to produce tumors in laboratory animals and possibly also in humans. Although unused ascorbic acid is quickly excreted in the urine, large and prolonged doses can result in the formation of bladder and kidney stones, interference with the effects of blood-thinning drugs, destruction of B12, and the loss of calcium from bones.

Sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, fresh strawberries, cantaloupe, pineapple, and guava. Good vegetable sources are broccoli, brussels sprouts, tomatoes, spinach, kale, green peppers, cabbage, and turnips.

As with all supplements, consult with your physician to determine if you should take a vitamin C supplement.

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