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Decorating eggs for Easter

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Decorating eggs for Easter is great chance to show off your creativity
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Get creative when you're decorating eggs for easter this year

Do you remember those little fizzy tablets of color we’d drop into cups or bowls of hot water and vinegar? And those little wire egg dippers that always dropped the egg at the worst possible moment, spattering color all over our hands, the table and whom ever had the misfortune of sitting too close? 

For most of us, decorating eggs for Easter never went further than that childhood experience. And you probably are doing the same kind of Easter egg coloring with your kids. Ready for something else?

Make this the year you get creative with decorating eggs for Easter.  Here are some new ideas for coloring and decorating eggs, for a fresh look in your Easter basket.

Head for the scrapbook store
The egg coloring kits of days gone by always came with a few vaguely spring themed stickers.  But why settle for some unattractive stickers that don’t stick?  Pick a theme for your Easter eggs, then head to your neighborhood scrapbook store and gather up some beautiful stickers, ribbons and rub-on designs.

Stuck for a theme?  How about a basket of travel themed eggs?  Embellish one with stickers and rub-ons from Paris, another from Japan, a third from Russia.  Nestle them into a pretty basket filled with pretty Easter grass or a shredded nest made from travel magazine pages and airline schedules. In no time, you’ll an international basket of lovely eggs – just perfect for an Easter dinner centerpiece.

Grab a Sharpie and some water colors
Who says decorating Easter eggs has to involve all-over color? Get a multi-color package of Sharpies and let your creativity shine through.  Draw flowers, spring images or just abstract designs, then color in your creations with acrylic or water color paints. 

This project doesn’t require tons of artistic talent – just the ability to doodle with a pen and fill in the spaces with colors. Take your time and let each section dry before going on to the next or your pretty designs will smear.

As an alternative, skip the paints and either let your black and white images stand alone, or fill in the outlines with color Sharpies. 



Note, egg shells are porous, so it may not be a good idea to eat these eggs once your designs are completed.  If you prefer, remove the egg from the shell before coloring using the two pinhole technique.  Make omelets from the eggs, then start on your designs on the empty shells.

Get inspired by the Faberge eggs
How about designing eggs with some serious bling?  The beautiful colors and sparkling jewels of the Faberge eggs from Russia have made them treasures eagerly viewed the world over.

Create your own version of these dazzling eggs. Use deep jewel-tone paints and tiny brushes to create simple or complex designs on your eggs.  Then add some bling and sparkle with rhinestones or glitter.

Display your bejeweled creations in fancy egg cups or in a basket lined with shredded metallic paper or ribbons.

Some Easter egg basics
No matter how you decide to do it, decorating eggs for Easter, there are a few safety rules you should remember.

Hardboiled eggs kept at room temperature spoil quickly, so if you want to eat some Easter eggs, store a few in the fridge.

Egg shells are extremely porous, so they will absorb any dyes or colors you use and transfer some to the egg itself. If you want to eat your finished product, make sure everything you use on the outside of the egg is non-toxic. That includes paints, dyes, pens, inks and adhesives.

Easter eggs don’t have to be perfect to be beautiful

Decorating eggs for Easter should be fun for the whole family, so keep it easy enough for everyone to participate. And, just for old time’s sake, maybe you’ll want to get some vinegar and a set of those fizzy tablets.  A little nostalgia never hurts, you know.


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