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How to tell authentic Ray Ban

Info Guru, Catalogs.com

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How to tell authentic Ray Ban sunglasses so you don't get ripped off by fakes

Ray-Bans look cool, stylish, and hip; they can be a symbol of status, an act of rebellion, or simply a way to look like you belong. We see them on celebrities and we want that image: of refined cool.

In the ever abundant marketplace, though, it's sometimes difficult to tell the real thing from a high-level fake. So, how to tell authentic ray ban sunglasses from fakes? Below, we'll provide a robust guide on the matter, delving into price levels, proper engravings, and gear which comes with the real deal version.

So, read on to find out how to differentiate between a high level fake and that of the authoritative Ray-Ban variety.

What You Should Receive

Here are a few items you should be receiving if the product you purchase is on the up and up:
  • Ray-Ban box
  • Case
  • Info booklet
  • Cloth

The cloth will always come in a protective sleeve so the first sign of trouble can be if the cloth comes sans sleeve. Most of the time, with the Wayfarers, for example, you'll normally receive a small booklet in addition, too.

The Case

In regards to the case which comes with the Ray-Ban purchase, a round seal should state "100% UV protection" at the top of the emblem. In the middle section, the term Ray-Ban should be in larger font and below that -- in a crescent shape -- it should say "Sunglasses by LUXOTTICA."


For a visual aid on a real Ray-Ban case, check out the I Love Ray-Bans website. This image-slash-emblem will always be on the left side of the case stamped in gold lettering.

Made In ... What?

According to the I Love Ray-Bans blogspot, many people believe that the products come solely from Italy but this isn't strictly the case. Luxottica is the manufacturer and their facilities can be found in both Italy and China. So, if you're examining your sunglasses and find "MADE IN CHINA" upon them, that's not a set-in-stone way to tell your lens are knock-offs.

It's actually a normal marking and doesn't mean anything insidious. Here are a list of the current models being made in both China and Italy:

  • RB3293
  • RB3387
  • RB3267
  • RB3386
  • RB3379
  • RB3211

The Lenses

One of the best ways in which to tell if your Ray-Bans are indeed of the fake variety is to check out the left lens. On either the inside or outside of the left lens -- depending on the model -- there should be a RB engraving. Hold it up to the light in order to see these scratch-like initials.

Without this, it's relatively certain you're holding a fake pair in your hands. Now with that being said, certain models -- like the RB3211 -- don't possess this engraving. And this is because they are one-piece lens; the ones which have two lens will all have the RB engraving on the left side of the Ray-Ban sunglasses.

Other Attributes of the Real Deal

Let's go over a few other potential points of emphasis for "fake" models:
  • When looking at the model number, it should always begin with RB and then be followed by a 4-digit number (i.e.: RB3016, RB2156, RB2140, etc.)
  • As for the nose pads, you'll see a RB signature of sorts inside the pad; according to the I Love Ray-Bans blogspot, most of the fakes don't even bother to engrave a signature on the nose pad
  • In regards to price, wayfarers on the Ray-Ban official website run anywhere from $125 up to $210. Thus, if you find a site or seller which is offering the brand for $29.99 it's most likely a dubious offer

To see a starter list of fake sellers, check out the Ray-Ban blogspot for more information. Hopefully, you now have the tools on how to tell authentic ray ban sunglasses from the fake variety. Pretty soon, you'll be styling in your new, uber-cool pair, not a care in the world.

Resources:

I Love Raybans: How to Spot Fake Ray-Bans.

Ray-Ban.com: Homepage.

Above photo attributed to bulinna

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