Nutrition

Does five hour energy work

Info Guru, Catalogs.com

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Five hour energy
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Does five hour energy work better than a cup of coffee

We've all seen the commercials with workers slogging through the day, performers too tired to perform, and truck drivers falling asleep at the wheel. Take 5-hour Energy, a little supplement in a bottle that fits in the palm of your hand, and you'll be good as new in no time. At least these are the claims made by its makers.

What's the difference then between coffee and these little bottles that declare themselves both natural and herbal alternatives with no crash later on? Below, we'll delve into what's actually in these bottles, as well as answer the question of does five hour energy work?

The Contents of the 5-hour Bottle

The drink makers have made it clear that if you take the supplement instead of coffee, you'll have five hours of increased energy, without the aforementioned crash as the caffeine wears off. So, what's actually in a bottle? 
  • Caffeine
  • B Vitamins
  • Citicoline
  • Phenylalanine
  • Taurine
  • Malic acid
  • Glucuronolactone
  • Tyrosine

And what are these items, you might be asking yourself?

Other than the boost provided by the caffeine, the other ingredients offer a mixed bag. It is essentially only the caffeine that is causing the boost after drinking the supplement. The other ingredients, according to most researchers, don't provide any benefits of increased energy or alertness.



The B vitamins within the bottle do include:

  • 150 percent of your daily needs for Vitamin B3
  • 2000 percent of your daily needs for Vitamin B6
  • 8333 percent of your daily needs for Vitamin B12

An excess of Vitamin B3 can sometimes create an uncomfortable flushing feeling for the user. As well, by taking in more than the recommended dosage of Vitamin B6, one can possibly do damage to the functionality of both nerves and muscles. Thus, there are an abundance of ingredients, but it's the caffeine which is the main determinant of how effective it is for the user.

Does It Work As Advertised?

Thanks to the caffeine boost -- which is said to be around the same as a cup of coffee -- it will provide you with increased feelings of alertness and renewed vigor. With this being said, the makers have not yet released exact quantities of caffeine within its product and instead keep this a trade secret.

As with most other caffeinated sources, there can be certain negative effects for the user. It offers a caffeine delivery system which, apart from increased feelings of alertness, can cause:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Jitteriness

Now, as compared to other drinks, the 5-hour variation offers users a chance to cut out sugar and only take in 4 calories per bottle. The label states that users should drink only half of the beverage for those looking to get a moderate boost to their systems. For those looking to rock out, they say to drink the entire bottle for the maximum amount of boost.

Experts have warned that users shouldn't consume more than two bottles per day, as the high levels of both caffeine and B vitamins can be unhealthy. Thus, the question does five hour energy work slowly melds into should I be drinking this concoction in the first place?

Would a cup of coffee actually be a better, healthier alternative?

According to most experts, 5-hour is a relatively safe alternative to coffee. It is important not to mix it with other caffeinated or alcoholic beverages. As well, users shouldn't exert themselves in sports activities or exercise after drinking it.

Thus, the drink lives up to its name, but should be taken in moderation, as with most things in life. For a prolonged jolt of energy and awareness in order to study for the big test, or stay up while driving cross-country, it can be an answer to your prayers.

But then again, so can a good cup of your favorite coffee.

Resources:

Livestrong: What is "5 Hour Energy" and How Does It Work?

OSU.edu: Is 5-Hour Energy Safe? Does It Work?

Above photo attributed to Inazakira

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