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Places to Live in New York City

Written by: Catalogs.com Editorial Staff

April 22, 2014
Filed Under Places 

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places to live in NYCby Catalogs.com Info Guru Aurora LaJambre

It’s one thing to visit New York City and fall in love with the surface of every neighborhood, quite another to choose one to actually live in.

Finding a corner in this city to call home takes persistence. You’ll probably have to live in a few not-quite-rights before finding the spot that suits your lifestyle and tastes.

This list of top places to live in New York City has something for everyone, including those with tight budgets, families and young professionals looking for excitement.


10. Roosevelt Island

Roosevelt Island

This tiny island with proportional green space sits smack between Queens and the larger island of Manhattan. By subway, you’re only about 10 minutes away from Midtown, or you can take the aerial tramway over the East River to the Upper East Side. What it lacks in street and night life and convenience, it makes up for with fantastic, up close views of the Manhattan from many of the apartments.

9. Chelsea

Chelsea

In addition to 400-plus art galleries, Chelsea is within easy walking distance of the Fashion and Design District, West Village and Midtown. Charming spaces and creative neighbors make this a great fit for those looking for constant stimulation.

8. Hell’s Kitchen

Hell’s Kitchen

Bordering the Theater District, Hell’s Kitchen offers an even mix of old and new luxury high rises. Developers are trying to rebrand this area as “Clinton”, but New Yorkers aren’t having it. Hell’s Kitchen has character and plenty of old buildings west of 9th Avenue where you can still hear the clip clop of carriage horses on cobblestones at the end of the night. It’s great for singles and couples who like to walk to the theatre, bars and restaurants.

7. Harlem

Harlem

If rich art and culture, and comfort food define your ideal next home, head to Harlem. Many of the buildings are pre-war, which means they’re much larger than other Manhattan rentals and boast excellent craftsmanship with architectural details like crown moldings and tin ceilings. Harlem is among the more affordable areas with the warm, neighborhoody feel many people look for.

6. West Village

West Village

The West Village is one of the few places to live in New York City that really only has one flaw: sky high prices. Refreshingly off the grid, you can get lost in its winding streets and beautifully narrow old New York buildings. Hard to walk down the waterfront with green piers or eat outside at one of the many cafes and not fall in love.

5. East Village

East Village

Opposite to the West Village in every way, the East Village offers the bustling nightlife and quaint day feel many new transplants are looking for. The living spaces are extremely small and often odd (a tub in the kitchen anyone?), but you get Tompkins Square Park for people and celebrity watching, loads of venues for live music and the tastiest cheap eats the city has to offer.

4. Park Slope

Park Slope

This Brooklyn neighborhood tops many glossy magazine lists for several reasons – low crime rate, restaurants serving up any cuisine you could want, bookish types and Prospect Park. High rents make it cost prohibitive for many young folks, but you can still find relatively good deals in South Slope. Many families live here so come prepared to navigate the strollers.

3. Fort Green and Clinton Hill

Fort Green and Clinton Hill

Fort Greene and Clinton Hill are incredibly diverse with a wider range of low and higher income residents than most areas. Many of the homes are in a historic district, which makes this one of the loveliest places in Brooklyn to stroll. The weekend flea market, central location to large retail stores and mom and pop restaurants satisfy many daily needs.

2. Financial District

Financial District

On weekends, Manhattan’s southern tip feels like a ghost town, in a good way. The narrow winding streets offer that old New York feel while the mix of new high rises provide plenty of housing options for families and studios for young adults. In addition to views, you get Battery Park, plenty of scenic space for running and bike riding – the waterfront and ferries to Staten Island and Governor’s Island (in summer).

1. Long Island City

Long Island City

Long Island City is a magnet for young stylish types looking for that magical combo of affordability, convenience and culture. PS1, small theaters and eclectic restaurants keep the streets especially active on weekends. This waterfront Queens neighborhood is ideal for photography lovers and quick commutes to Manhattan.



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