Health

Who should use insoles

Info Guru, Catalogs.com

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Custom insoles make your feet a whole lot happier and healthier
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Who should use insoles? Anyone suffering from foot or toe pain!

If you have never been to a podiatrist (foot doctor) you may not know what 'orthotic' means. It is a device inserted into shoes to correct problems, including an irregular or abnormal walking pattern. An insole is a type of orthotic. You can buy them over-the-counter or have them custom made.

When this device is put into shoes it helps the wearer walk better and easier and run more capably and comfortably. Standing is also easier on a person's feet and legs when he has cushioning and extra support in his shoes.

Wearing non-supportive shoes or those not fitting properly wreaks havoc on feet, legs and the back. Wear shoes that fit well and provide wide toe boxes so your toes don't get scrunched, which leads to a host of toe problems.

Take advantage of inserts such as insoles. They relieve aching arches, sore heels and bruising of the ball of the foot and back of the foot. Orthotics provide support and protect and don't cost an arm and a leg. The insert makes all in the difference in how you feel, eliminating tired, aching legs and feet.

Insoles

This is a strip fitting inside the bottom of a shoe. It cushions the foot, which is essential for the health of the foot, and it provides support.





Insoles are designed to target various issues. A high arch insole is created to provide the necessary correction and support a high-arched person requires. For those with flat feet there are explicit inserts for this issue.

If your problem area is the arch --- as in you have too much arch or not enough --- insoles constructed of various types of material, including cowhide leather, firm polyester or silicone, help correct these specific problems and eradicate pain associated with high or low arches.

If your problem area is the ball of the foot (the front part of the foot, on the bottom) get an insert designed specifically to provide protection to this part of the foot. Women wearing high heels often experience foot pain because their foot is shoved forward. The ball of the foot carries a lot of weight, not to mention the impact this position has on toes. A ball protection orthotic lessens stress on the ball and on the toes.

Some experience heel pain because they stand all day or must walk a lot. Heel supports, another type of orthotic, are available. They provide cushioning for the heel, which lessens pain.

Differences

There is a difference between over-the-counter insoles and an orthotic. The former is prefabricated and mass distributed. The latter is designed specifically for a person's feet and formed to address his particular problem. When custom made, the insert is molded precisely to the person's feet.

Who Needs Them?

Inserts can be used by anyone. Older people tend to have foot and toe issues so they benefit greatly when using orthotics.

Children sometimes require orthotics. Foot problems are not exclusive to the elderly.

The feet of athletes take a beating. There are inserts designed to protect, cushion and lessen the stress playing sports has on feet. An athlete cannot afford to have sore, aching or injured feet and toes. Bad feet can put a person, athlete or otherwise, out of commission in no time flat.

Diabetics

Those with this disease must be vigilant about protecting their feet. A foot or toe infection or injury can have serious ramifications, even fatal consequences for the diabetic.

Inserts for diabetics are made of soft but dense material, providing maximum cushioning, while maintaining the proper bio-mechanical position and function of the foot. This type insert is also ideal for those experiencing arthritis in the feet.

If you are experiencing foot problem, consider getting insoles. They can make all the difference.

Protect your feet! They deserve to be well-taken care of.

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