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Cities in Oklahoma

Written by: Catalogs.com Editorial Staff

January 10, 2014
Filed Under Places 

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oklahomaContributed by Info Guru Terri Wallace

Oklahoma has a lot more to offer than prairies, dust, and tumble weeds.

The locals don’t all wear ten gallon hats and say, “Ya’ll.” In fact, Oklahoma has made some amazing contributions to the arts, education, and the special needs community. Take a quick tour of what the state has to offer with this list of the top ten cities in Oklahoma.


10. Broken Arrow

 Broken Arrow

Broken Arrow is a picturesque city, and boasts one of state’s lowest crime rates. The city has revitalized its downtown and built an impressive performing arts center. Broken Arrow’s education system consistently ranks well, and the city also boasts good job growth and affordable housing. Despite the amenities of a much larger town, this city has retained the quaint charm of a smaller town. True to its roots, Broken Arrow still celebrates its heritage with an annual Rooster Days Festival.

9. Edmond

Edmond

Located just north of Oklahoma City, Edmond is nestled into part of central Oklahoma known for its hills and oak trees. Edmond has renewed its dedication to public arts, and the city is adorned with murals, stained glass and steel sculptures. This love the arts is especially evident on Main Street, where statues anchor nearly every street corner.

8. Norman

Norman

Norman, Oklahoma is a bustling college town swathed in crimson and cream. Oklahoma Sooner fans may come for a rousing football game, but graduates of Oklahoma University frequently stay to enjoy the robust job growth, friendly atmosphere, and affordability.

7. Enid

Enid

While well known as the Wheat Capital, Enid also boasts a love of the arts. The city boasts the oldest symphony in the state, is home to the Tri-State Music Festival, and hosts annual productions of Shakespeare in the Park.

6. Lawton

Lawton

Lawton, Oklahoma is situated on the edge of the Great Plains, and offers nature lovers eighty parks and recreation areas. Boating, fishing, and camping are permitting on the three area lakes. To the northwest of the city, the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge provides plenty of places for leisurely nature walks.

5. Bartlesville

Bartlesville

Bartlesville is a city that successfully combines opportunities for education, the arts, architecture, and a deep respect for nature. The city boasts two universities, the OK Mozart Festival, buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, and Frank Phillips’ former home (now a museum maintained by the Oklahoma Historical Society) called Woolaroc (which is a portmanteau of the words: woods, lakes, and rocks).

4. Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

With its abundance of museums and theaters, Oklahoma City’s dedication to the arts is unrivalled in the area. This love of the arts has also bolstered efforts at urban renewal, such as the massive make-over that become known as “Brick Town.” After the success of initial efforts at revitalization, Crystal Bridge and Myriad Botanical Gardens have since furthered the rebirth of downtown.

3. Stillwater

Stillwater

Home to Oklahoma State University, Stillwater is more than just your average “college town.” Stillwater is home to Special Olympics Oklahoma, the largest Special Olympics in the United States. Stillwater is also home to “Red Dirt” music, and many musicians got their start in this city’s bars and venues.

2. Tulsa

Tulsa

Located in the heart of “Green County,” Tulsa is a booming metropolis that appreciates and helps sustain the arts. From its revitalized downtown to its upper-crust urban sprawl, Tulsa is a city on the move. Tulsa boasts one of the greatest concentrations of art deco architecture in the United States, and it also has examples of more futuristic Post-Modern stylings. The city’s artistic leanings don’t end with architecture, Tulsa also has many museums, cultural centers, performing arts venues, ethnic and cultural festivals, as well as parks and wildlife preserves.

1. Jenks

Jenks

Although known as the Antique Capital of Oklahoma, Jenks surprisingly progressive. The quaint Main Street belies the town’s vibrant growth and dedication to education. Jenks’s school system is the envy of much larger cities and their high school football team is consistently among the top ranked in its division.



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